Coming soon to BSoMT…unless we run out of Diesel …or we split a link in one of the tracks in which case it may be a little while before turrets and Tigers finally arrives…in fact none of the above is true any more for here it is in all of its anticlimactic glory.

BSoMT takes command of a Sherman and heads off for a brief trek across France sampling wine, cheese and Tiger-bread…well I will be driving the English adaptation actually! (the Firefly)… not only because I am of English origin, but because it also has a much better anti-tank cannon and there are a lot of nasty Tigers out there! If I am to be cannon fodder for them, I want to at least give back as good as I get.

Patton’s Best (my rather grubby and war-worn copy)

 

 

 

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Curses! Stuck in reverse all the way across Western France. Out of bread and cheese…all these quaint little French villages are crawling with Tigers…French zoos really have a lot to answer for, you know……yes, I know Tigers are open field tanks but as Kelley’s Heroes is one of my all time favourite films, I always picture Shermans up against Tigers in the narrow French streets…how else would a Sherman stop itself from being blown to iron filings?

 

INTRO:

I’ve always had a fascination with mechanised elements of war…I don’t like war generally, have no fondness of war films (except the few where war is incidental to the principal plot like Kelley’s Heroes, Hannibal Brookes, Escape to Victory) but the development of armoured might…cunning, and often ludicrous, solutions to military conundrums, the tank has a place of admiration for me in recognition of its engineering, versatility, development and design concepts.

…well, now I discover I get to drive my very own Sherman across 1940’s France.

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What’s All The Fuss About?

I have absolutely no idea if there is even the slightest fuss about this little title from the Avalon Hill stable of the 80’s. I made my copy as a print & play effort using files from BGG so don’t even know if original versions are available now (maybe for a gazillion quid on e-bay)

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There is a vassal module for the game but, again, I don’t really partake in digitised versions of games, preferring the tactile nature of card, paper and whatever other tasty components are bunged in a game box.

And so back to the heading…I doubt this was ever a particularly popular title because in its day, solo gameplay was not what would be deemed “the thing self-respecting gamers do”. In today’s climate that is a completely different story and solo play has been on a constant rise in popularity over the last few years…and as a solo gamer, I decided to check this out after watching the Original Grognard play-through on Youtube.

 https://youtu.be/9RIOrAzFMJE

Popular or not, I have to admit upfront I really enjoyed this game despite a number of, shall we say wrinkles?

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Immersion or Subversion?

I don’t think the immersive nature of this game can be questioned. The way the game works really drops you in the turret hole and puts you at the spearhead of a unit moving its way across occupied territory…but more on the nice little mechanics later. Aesthetically the game is quite good. The landscape map is nice, the tank sheet is functional and the counter art I have used (not original work) is pleasant enough but it’s not going to win any awards for presentation. That said, it is the effective way the game plays out that is responsible for immersing the lonely tank commander into WW2 Northern France; not a reliance on pretty pictures to do the job.

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Every small element of piloting a tank across a landscape is present from issuing commands to driver, gunners, spotters to the guy who polishes the bullets. There is so much more to it than ‘roll a die and move X number of hexes’. In actual fact the tank itself doesn’t move at all but I will touch on this later. This level of detail makes one feel that we truly control the destiny of the tank and its crew. Spotting enemy, discovering the sneaky beggers hiding in all sorts of terrain, relying on other tanks (off the map but still part of the group)…There is a point to the game and experience points are gained for a variety of achieved goals be it blowing up a an Elefant (zoos again…

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no I refer to the Ferdinand variety of tank destroyer), or traversing a number of enemy sectors of control or simply drinking gallons of local wine…but this almost feels insignificant as all your time and energy is dedicated to just staying alive.

 

Mechanical Attributes:

The entire game follows a rather lengthy but logical sequence of events, actions and situations each turn. The chart under the map leads us through each stage and there is nothing exciting or groundbreaking here. Where things do get interesting is with the handling of movement and relative positioning.

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Movement is simple. A marker is moved from sector to sector showing the tank crews progress and indicating the potential likelihood of encountering enemies (number, strength etc) but the tank its self is a stationary marker in the centre of a zoned sheet. This controls positioning of enemies and their orientation with regards to the Sherman (facing, side on etc). Now hold on to your tank driver goggles because this is the interesting part. If the Sherman moved all enemies would move a zone towards the Sherman marker

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As commander of the tank, the solo player has to think of, and track all the ammunition that may be required for a successful mission. Decisions like ‘will we meet mostly light resistance of troops and trucks…at which point HE rounds would be suitable …or are we likely to face a King Tiger…at which point AP rounds would have been more appropriate.

spotting adds an additional level of realism. All armoured enemy, for example, would be considered a Tiger until spotted…making it important to identify foe in order to dispatch them readily and not take unessesary damage

Needless to say, as with many solo war-game styles, there is death by a million charts which takes a while to become familiar with, but they are all straight forward and do a sterling job. Obviously this must be considered when considering tackling Patton’s Best.

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There is a fan made version I have not looked at in much detail over on BGG that allows us to drive a Russian tank which sounds interesting for those with an Eastern Front orientation

The Real Nitty Gritty:

  • Winners and Losers: Right out of the barrel I have to point out that this is a losers game…no, not a game for sad, solo players with nothing better to do…it is a game you are destined to lose. Are there any real winners in war? It is a great, entertaining tank battle simulation but ultimately there are so many foes to contend with that surviving to the end is pretty tricky. I assume not impossible but I have not managed it yet…I have not been discorages, mind you, as I love the way even a game as old as this still feels contemporary
  • Rules is Rules is Rules: There is a 20 page rule book in a fairly standard War Game presentation. It coveres all the game mechanics and identifies all game components in a military fashion. The game itself plays along a series of squential steps, all of which are nicely posted on the gameboard. For the most part it is easy enough to follow but ‘death by charts’ is an unavoidable aspect of this nature of boardgame. The step by step proceedure is good but could gave benefited from a better referencing system to the appropriate charts. Once you get over this, the game actually works nicely.
  • Lucky Beggers: It is possible to plan and strategies but ultimately a large proportion of decisions, placement of enemy and reactions are dependant on dice throwing and referencing the results against the many tables. Some luck gan be negated by actions but luck of the dice really is a foreground feature. Haters of dice beware
  • Highs and Lows: Aesthetically this looks pleasant…a nice strole in a sherman through pleasant french orchards…but in reality it is a war simulation. If you think about the theme, it can become a little heavy but ultimately it is only a game so you draw from it what you will.

 

Me, Myself and I:

This is a long time for me to be cooped up in a small, hot, smelly steel box with myself and I…but how else am I to drive over walls, crash through buildings and crush Citroën 2CV’s? It is a long game and bloody difficult to succeed in victory but to get that “Solo WW2 drive a tank for a month” fix, this is the one to get into. I liked the calendar mechanic used for setup and game play…it dictates the chances of encountering hostile enemy and works as a descent game timer.

 

Yay or Nay?

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This is a tricky one. For me, as an enjoyable, testing solo title,  it is a yay. I thoroughly enjoy it and, although each play is effectively the same mission, the variability of potential enemy contact make each game a new challenge. That said, I would not pull this game out too often and I could see some people finding it a little dated and dry (especially with so many charts)

if you look carefully on the caterpillar tracks, you may see stamped a BSoMT 1d8 roll of (6).



 

Something for the weekend, Sir?

  • The Original Grognard play-through using the vassal module

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